Irish Language Dialect Pronunciation Comparison

NOTE: THIS PAGE IS VERY NEW AND CONTAINS ERRORS. WORK IN PROGRESS.

Every guide I've found for how Irish is pronounced in a given region is either incomplete or it contradicts other guides. So this is my attempt to put all the information together so I can investigate the contradictions and try to fill in the missing parts. The information comes from years of comments on Irish Language Forum, the recordings on Teanglann's pronunciation database, various other recordings by natives, twenty-something CDs of kids songs, and a few books.

Words in Irish change their pronunciation based on dialect, sub-dialect and grammar. For example, some verb endings change their pronunciation when they're followed by a pronoun. This makes it very hard to learn the pronunciation because even if all the books and online recordings give one consistant pronunciation for a word, when you hear it in a sentence followed by a pronoun you won't

What's the pronuncation rule for... In Ulster In Connacht In Munster
...a consonant at the start of a word followed by a slender vowel ('i' or 'e') soft hard:
so in "go dtí the 'd' is hard like "dealer" or "decent"
...the 'f' at the start of the conditional tense ending In Donegal and Cois Fharraige (Conemara) the 'f' is pronounced /h/, in most other dialects /f/
(source)
f
...the 'f' in the word "féin" h h féin is often pronounced with an f in Cork Irish -- after a prepositional pronoun ending in a vowel, it might be héin eg: dó féin === do héin. But in other circumstances féin -- or féinig. (source)